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About Badami

Set in beautiful countryside at the foot of a red sandstone ridge, the small rural town of Badami was once the capital of the Chalukyan. Empire covered much of the central Deccan between the 4th centuries AD. Here and at nearby Aihole and Pattadakal, you can see some of the earliest and rock- cut caves. The forms and sculptural work at there sites provided inspiration for the later Hindu empires which rose and fell in the arrival of the Muslims. Though principally promoters of the vedic culture, the Chalukyans were tolerant of all sects, and elements of Shaivism, Vaishnaivism, Jainism and even Buddhism can be found in many of their temples. Badami was the Chalukyan capital from about 540 AD  until 757 AD when the Chalukyans were overthrown by the Rashtrakutas. The surrounding hills are dotted with temples, fortifications, carvings and inscriptions dating not just from the Chalukyan period, but from other times when the site was occupied as a fortress. After it fell to the Rashtrakutsa, Badami was occupied successively by the Chalukyans of Kalyan (a separate branch of the western Chalukyan), the Kaachuryas, the Yadavas of Devagiri, the Vijayanagar Empire, the Adil Shahi kings of Bajipur and the Marathas. All these various rulers have left their mark at Badami, and there's even a Pallava inscription dating back to 642 AD when their king, Narasimha Varman I, Briefly overwhelmed the Chalukyans and occupied Badami for 13 years before being driven out.

Population    18,200
Telephone Code 08357

History
Badami was the capital of the Early Chalukyas, who ruled much of Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh between the 6th and 8th centuries. It was founded in 540 A.D. by Pulakesi I, an early ruler of the Chalukyas. His sons Kirthivarman and his brother Mangalesha I constructed the cave temples. The greatest among them was Pulakesi II who defeated many kings but failed to capture Pallava's capital Kanchipuram.
The rock-cut Badami Cave Temples were sculpted mostly between the 6th and 8th centuries. The four cave temples represent the secular nature of the rulers then, with tolerance and a religious following that inclines towards Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. cave 1 is devoted to Shiva, and Caves 2 and 3 are dedicated to Vishnu, whereas cave 4 displays reliefs of Jain Tirthankaras. Deep caverns with carved images of the various incarnations of Hindu gods are strewn across the area, under boulders and in the red sandstone. From an architectural and archaeological perspective, they provide critical evidence of the early styles and stages of the southern Indian architecture.
The Pallavas under the king Narasimhavarman I (also called Mamalla Pallava) seized it in 642 A.D. Vikramaditya I of Chalukyas drove back Pallavas in 654 A.D. and led a successful attack on Kanchipuram, the capital of Pallavas [This statement needs reference]. The Rashtrakutas absorbed karnataka including Badami around 757 AD and the town lost its importance. The later Chalukyas of Kalyani defeated them and were able to keep region from 973 A.D. to 1189 A.D., when it was occupied by the Hoysalas. Then it passed on to Vijayanagara empire, The Adil Shahis, The Savanur Nawabs, The Marathas, Hyder Ali. The Britishers made it part of the Bombay Presidency.


Geography

Badami is located at . It has an average elevation of 586 metres 1922 ft. It is located at the mouth of a ravine between two rocky hills and surrounds Agastya tirtha water reservoir on the three other sides. The total area of the town is 10.3 square kilometers.

It is located 30 kilometers from Bagalkot,128 kilometers from Bijapur, 132 kilometers from Hubli, 46 kilometers from Aihole, another ancient town, and 500 kilometers from Bangalore, the state capital.

Climate

  • Summer - March to June
  • Spring - Jan to March
  • Monsoons - July to October that contributes to rainfall
  • Winter - November to Jan

The temperature ranges from minimum 23 degrees to 45 degrees during summer and from 15 to 29 degrees in winter. The rainfall of the area is 50 centimeters. Best time to visit is between low humid season from November and March.

The cool climate has made it a safe haven for the monkeys of south India. Tourists often flock to Bamadi for the opportunity to see monkeys interact in a natural environment. There are even glass enclosures in trees, called Glass Baristas, where one can sit and have a meal while monkeys interact right beyond the glass.

FAIRS & FESTIVALS
A number of annual temple festivals are held in towns near Badami. The annual temple festival, held at Banashankari, in the month of January-February is worth visiting; so are the Virupaksha Temple Car Festival and Mallikarjuna Temple Festival held in Pattadakal during March-April. 

 
 
List of Badami hotels